Invited speakers

Keynote speakers

Dr Matthew Dunn

School of Aerospace, Mechanical and Mechatronic Engineering, University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia

Title: Laser diagnostics to understand the formation of soot

Biography
Dr Matthew Dunn is a senior lecturer at the School of Aerospace, Mechanical and Mechatronic Engineering at the University of Sydney. He is presently engaged in research related to the development and application of advanced laser diagnostics to combustion and reacting flow systems. He completed his PhD at the University of Sydney in 2009 investigating finite-rate chemistry effects in turbulent premixed flames. From 2009–2011 Dr Dunn was a postdoctoral researcher at the Combustion Research Facility at Sandia National Laboratories at Livermore, California USA, applying Raman-Rayleigh-LIF line imaging in a range of premixed, stratified, partially premixed and non-premixed flames.

Associate Professor Sean O’Byrne

School of Engineering and Information Technology, The University of New South Wales, Australian Defence Force Academy, Canberra, Australia

Title: Diode lasers for quantitative hypersonic diagnostics

Biography
Associate Professor Sean O’Byrne has been working in the field of laser-based diagnostics techniques and hypersonics for more than 20 years.  He received undergraduate physics and education degrees at the University of New England, and Masters (1997) and PhD (2002) degrees in physics from the Australian National University. From 2002 to 2003 he worked on dual-pump CARS measurements of species concentrations and temperatures in scramjets at NASA Langley Research Center. Since 2004 he has been working at the University of New South Wales, Canberra, on laser ignition methods and hypersonic separated flows.

Professor Epaminondas Mastorakos

Department of Engineering, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK

Title: Recent developments in turbulent combustion modelling and laser-based experiments and their relevance to practical systems

Biography
Epaminondas Mastorakos has experience with experiments, computational fluid dynamics, and combustion, especially in the fields of chemical mechanism reduction, turbulent reacting flow experimentation and modelling, ignition and extinction of flames, spray flames, gas turbine and diesel engine combustion, natural gas engine ignition mechanisms, and combustion in porous media. He has also worked on atmospheric chemistry, aerosols, and dispersion of pollutants. He has over 150 archival publications, more than 140 conference papers. He is Associate Editor of “Combustion and Flame” and sits at the Editorial Boards of many major combustion journals. He is co-author of a graduate textbook on turbulent reacting flows and co-editor of a research collection. He has acted as consultant to various industries in the engines and energy area and is currently the Combustion Research Coordinator in the Rolls-Royce / Cambridge University Gas Turbine Partnership. His current h-index stands at 37.

Invited technical talks

Dr. Mohamad Sabsabi

National Research Council Canada, Canada

Title: A Look at Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy as an Analytical Tool and Its Applications

Biography

Mohamad Sabsabi is a principal research officer at the National Research Council (NRC) of Canada. He got his Ph.D.in physics from the University of Paris in 1988. After his postdoc at the University of Sherbrooke, he joined the NRC in 1992 where he initiated activities in laser plasma spectroscopy. Mohamad and his team have succeeded in pioneering and implementing LIBS technology for many applications. He initiated and led, for four years, the NRC High Efficiency Mining (HEM) program to aim improvements in the mining value chain by developing advanced sensors, process technologies, and advanced materials. He holds 18 patents and has more than 500 publications (papers and conference presentations) covering fundamental aspects and industrial applications of laser-induced plasmas. Mohamad was guest editor of Spectrochimica Acta B, Analytical and Bioanalytical Chemistry (ABC), Applied Optics (AO) and Applied Spectroscopy. He is a chairman of the LIBS2006 conference in Montreal, vice chair and co-organizer of the international LIBS conferences.

Dr Callum Atkinson

Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering
Monash University, Australia

Title: Volumetric density field measurements in turbulent flows 

Biography

Dr. Atkinson received his PhD in Mechanical Engineering in 2012 as a Cotutelle PhD between Monash University and Ecole Centrale de Lille in France on the development and application of three-dimensional measurement techniques for investigating the 3D structure of wall-bounded turbulence. This included the development of the MLOS approach that is now widely used in commercial software for tomographic particle image velocimetry. His post-doc work focused on the experimentally establishment of a self-similar adverse pressure gradient turbulent boundary layer and complementary direct numerical simulations. He was awarded an ARC Discovery Early Career Researcher Award (DECRA) fellowship in 2016 developing experimental techniques and facilities for the simultaneous measurement of fluid temperature and velocity fluctuations in turbulent flows layers over natural and engineered surface roughness and is currently a senior lecturer in the Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering at Monash University. His present research interests also include looking at means to directly couple the relative strengths of optical measurements with higher fidelity direct numerical simulations and the development of hybrid rocket motors and sounding rockets.

Professor Sheng Dai

Department of Chemical Engineering, Brunel University, London, UK

Title: Spatially resolved surface enhanced raman scattering for multiplex identification of antibody-antigen interactions

Biography
Sheng Dai received his Bachelor degree from Zhejiang University, and Master and PhD degrees from Nanyang Technological University. After that, he worked as a postdoc fellow at McMaster University, University of Alberta and University of Toronto. Later, he was employed as a Senior Lecturer and Associate Professor at the University of Adelaide. In 2017, he took the Chair of Chemical Engineering at Newcastle University. Recently, he joined Brunel University London as the founding Head of Chemical Engineering Department. His research is to develop diverse applications of polymers, nanomaterials and interfaces in health science, water and clean energy. He has published over 130 journal articles associated with 7200 citations and an H-index of 42.

Dr Hans Stauffer

Spectral Energies, Ohio, USA

Title: Recent advances in coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering and high-speed burst-mode diagnostics: characterization of combustion environments

Biography

Dr. Hans U. Stauffer is a Senior Research Scientist at Spectral Energies, LLC. His research focuses on the development of novel laser diagnostics, primarily for hypersonic and combustion applications, with an emphasis on fluorescence and four-wave-mixing diagnostics that exploit the unique properties of ultrafast laser technology. He received his Ph.D. in Physical Chemistry from Cornell University in 2000 studying atomic and molecular collisional dynamics using crossed molecular beam techniques. Dr. Stauffer carried out postdoctoral work from 2000–2003 with Prof. Stephen Leone at NIST/JILA (University of Colorado at Boulder) and at the University of California-Berkeley; this research emphasized coherent control over the time evolution of molecular systems via phase and amplitude shaping of ultrashort optical excitation pulses. From 2003–2009, Dr. Stauffer was an Assistant Professor of Chemistry at Iowa State University (Ames, IA). He has received both an NRC Postdoctoral Fellowship and an NRC Senior Fellowship.

Associate Professor Aamir Farooq

Clean Combustion Research Center, King Abdullah University of Science and Technology, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia

Title: Quantum cascade lasers in combustion

Biography
Dr. Farooq received his Ph.D. in Mechanical Engineering from Stanford University in 2010, and joined King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST) as an Assistant Professor. He was promoted to the rank of Associate Professor in 2016. He is the principal investigator of the Chemical Kinetics and Laser Sensors Laboratory in the Clean Combustion Research Center (CCRC) at KAUST. His research interests are in the areas of energy, combustion chemistry, spectroscopy, and laser-based sensors. His group carries out experimental chemical kinetics research using shock tubes, rapid compression machine and optical diagnostics. Dr. Farooq has worked extensively on novel spectroscopic strategies to develop optical sensors based on mid-infrared quantum-cascade lasers for chemical, biomedical and environment-monitoring applications. He has authored over 100 refereed journal articles and has given invited talks at a number of international conferences.

Dr Abel Santos

School of Chemical Engineering, University of Adelaide, Adelaide, Australia

Title: Engineering of photonic and plasmonic sensors for biomedical applications

Biography
Dr Abel Santos received his BEng in Chemical Engineering from the Universitat Jaume I (Spain) in 2006, and MEng and PhD degrees in Electronic Engineering from the Universitat Rovira i Virgili (Spain) in 2007 and 2011, respectively. In 2014 he was awarded an ARC-DECRA, and currently he is a ‘Research for Impact’ Fellow in the School of Chemical Engineering, member of the Institute for Photonics and Advanced Sensing (IPAS), and associate investigator of the ARC Centre of Excellence for Nanoscale BioPhotonics (CNBP) at the University of Adelaide, where he works on structural engineering of photonic crystals based on nanoporous anodic alumina.

Dr Elias Kristensson

Division of Combustion Physics, Lund University, Lund, Sweden

Title: The development and application of structured laser illumination planar imaging

Biography
During his time as a PhD student, Elias worked on developing laser-based imaging methods for combustion and spray research. In particular, Elias focused his attention on the multiple scattering problem that is associated with spray visualisation and developed an imaging method called SLIPI (Structured Laser Illumination Planar Imaging) that greatly improves visualisation through such scattering media. 
After finishing his postdoc at Lund University, Elias focus was redirected towards ultrafast videography and developed an image-coding method that delivers record-breaking video rates (5 THz) and was recently granted an ERC Starting Grant to pursue this line of research.

Dr Zhiwei Sun

School of Mechanical Engineering, University of Adelaide, Adelaide, Australia

Title: Laser diagnostics in turbulent sooting flames: Why it is challenging and how we did it

Biography
Dr Sun got his Ph.D. degree in 2012 from the Division of Combustion Physics, Lund University of Sweden. He has been working at the Centre for Energy Technology (CET) of the University of Adelaide since the graduation. His research focuses on the development and application of advanced laser diagnostics in combustion and other high-temperature thermal processes. With high temporal and spatial resolutions, multiple key parameters, e.g. temperature, species and velocity, in turbulent flows are simultaneously measured in two dimensions using non-intrusive laser techniques. These measurements provide necessary data to understand the complex turbulent reacting flows. His results are based on unique techniques developed and applied for measurements of turbulent sooting flames that are laden with large molecules and nanoparticles.Dr Sun got his Ph.D. degree in 2012 from the Division of Combustion Physics, Lund University of Sweden. He has been working at the Centre for Energy Technology (CET) of the University of Adelaide since the graduation. His research focuses on the development and application of advanced laser diagnostics in combustion and other high-temperature thermal processes. With high temporal and spatial resolutions, multiple key parameters, e.g. temperature, species and velocity, in turbulent flows are simultaneously measured in two dimensions using non-intrusive laser techniques. These measurements provide necessary data to understand the complex turbulent reacting flows. His results are based on unique techniques developed and applied for measurements of turbulent sooting flames that are laden with large molecules and nanoparticles.